The Reluctant Fortune-Teller

The Reluctant Fortune-Teller by Keziah Frost

Norbert, 73, lives a quiet and happy life with his Chihuahua, Ivy. He is surprised when his art teacher Carlotta comes to visit, along with her friends Birdie and Margaret. They have observed that he might be having financial difficulties, and propose training him to read cards so that he can tell fortunes at a local cafe. When he has some vet bills to pay off, he tucks Ivy into a carrier, and charms the locals and tourists with his readings. He is naturally observant and has a wealth of knowledge from reading Reader’s Digest, and enjoys helping people. Carlotta is worried that he’ll be too successful, but the only real suspense is whether Norbert will be able to help Carlotta’s troubled granddaughter Summer. Gibbon Corner, a tourist town on Lake Ontario, is a fitting setting for this witty, heartwarming novel. If you like cozy mysteries or gentle reads, you’ll probably enjoy spending time with Norbert and Ivy.

Brenda


Murder in an English Village

Murder in an English Village by Jessica Ellicott

Ladylike Edwina Davenport advertises for a lodger after her mother’s death. American adventuress Beryl Halliwell replies to her ad by crashing her car into a pillar at the end of Edwina’s drive. After Edwina is attacked while walking her dog, the odd couple, former classmates, pair up to investigate a the disappearance of Agnes, a Land Army girl who went missing two years earlier. Then they find the body of a young film buff in a field. A strong sense of place brings the 1920 English village of Walmsley Parva to life, and the engaging characters and their investigation of the village’s secrets delight in this leisurely-paced British cozy, the first in a new mystery series.

Brenda


The Bookshop on the Corner

The Bookshop on the Corner by Jenny Colgan

If you like reading about books, village life, starting over, the Scottish highlands and/or romance, then you will probably enjoy this heartwarming contemporary novel. Nina is a librarian in Birmingham, where branch libraries are closing and books are no longer the main focus. When her roommate Surinder won’t let her bring any more books back to their apartment in case the stairs collapse, and she doesn’t get hired at the new main library, Nina buys a former bakery van in a Scottish village and converts it into a mobile bookstore. Surinder and a friendly train engineer help bring the books she’s acquired to Kirrinfief, and Nina’s adventure begins. Luckily, Nina’s able to rent a converted barn from sheep farmer Lennox, and a local dance and midsummer festival help her feel welcome. Nina has a real gift for finding the right kind of book for each reader, and finds enough customers at area farmer’s markets, even though the big van is hard to drive. I really liked the highlands village setting, and the descriptions of Nina’s challenges at starting over. I would have enjoyed more about the bookselling and a bit less romantic drama, but other readers will probably disagree. Readalikes include books by Alexandra Raife and Katie Fforde, along with The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend by Katarina Bivald. Enjoy!

Brenda


To Be Where You Are

To Be Where You Are by Jan Karon

It’s always enjoyable to visit Mitford, North Carolina, home of Father Tim and his artist wife, Cynthia. This time around, readers get to catch up on most of the town’s residents, and visit young veterinarian Dooley and his wife at their busy animal clinic a few miles outside Mitford. In town, everyone seems to have a big life event, from writing a book, riding in a parade, buying an RV, adopting a pet, to having a baby. Retired Father Tim helps out at the local grocery store when the owner gets sick, and puts off taking Cynthia on a big road trip. So, no real plot, just a very pleasant visit with the folks in Mitford. The first book in the long cozy series is At Home in Mitford.

Brenda

 


Good Night, Mr. Wodehouse

wodehouse jacketGood Night, Mr. Wodehouse by Faith Sullivan

Nell Stillman, a minor character in other novels by Sullivan, gets to shine here. This is Nell’s life story, from early married life to old age, all set in the small town of Harvester, Minnesota. After her husband dies suddenly, leaving her with young son Hillyard, Nell is relieved to be offered a job as third-grade teacher. However, teachers in the late 19th century and early 20th century were held to very high standards. Small town gossip can be harsh, and often anonymous. Nell brings a young cousin, Elvira, to live with Nell and Hilly in their apartment over Rabel’s Meat Market. A few years later, she leaves town in disgrace, and Nell is blamed. Nell’s main comfort in life, besides her loyal friends, is reading and re-reading the light, humorous novels of P.G. Wodehouse. My only complaint about this absorbing, character driven novel is that a book about the value of light humorous fiction shouldn’t be quite so serious and often melancholy in tone. I enjoyed reading about the changes in Harvester and in Nell’s apartment over the years including the building of a library, but two world wars and the depression do not make for light reading, especially as Hilly comes home from war shell-shocked. Nell does find love later in life, but a book that covers many decades inevitably includes several deaths. To cheer up I might read one of P.G. Wodehouse’s books (our library owns thirty, and they are quite funny, if now somewhat dated), but I plan to read more of Sullivan’s work, starting with The Cape Ann.
Brenda


Somewhere Safe with Somebody Good

somewhere safe jacketSomewhere Safe with Somebody Good, by Jan Karon

It’s been nine years since there’s been a new book by Jan Karon set in the small town of Mitford, North Carolina, but I think it’s been worth the wait. Father Tim, an Episcopal priest, first appeared in At Home in Mitford in 1994. The two most recent books featuring Father Tim and his wife Cynthia have been set in Mississippi and Ireland. Cynthia is still writing and illustrating children’s books, and Father Tim is struggling with how to find meaning in retirement. When he is asked to preach again at the Episcopal church in Mitford, it’s a tough decision. Adopted son Dooley is in college and has given a friendship ring to Lace. Dooley’s younger brother Sammy lives next door, and Tim wonders how he can reach out to the troubled teen. An unexpected opportunity to volunteer at the local bookstore one or two days per week while the pregnant owner is on bed rest gives Tim the chance to re-connect with his friends and neighbors as Christmas approaches. All of Mitford’s quirky characters make an appearance, with plenty of laughter and some tears in this heartwarming novel.
Brenda