Where Nobody Knows Your Name

baseball jacketWhere Nobody Knows Your Name: Life in the Minor Leagues of Baseball by John Feinstein

Sportswriter John Feinstein spent the 2012 season with players, managers, and umpires of baseball’s International League. Life in Triple A is vividly described, and is shown in stark contrast to the major leagues, but the athletes Feinstein meets show a real love of the game of baseball. Several players are featured, with their history of teams, accomplishments, and injuries, but you don’t get a player’s whole story all at once, and some of them blend together. Some former major league stars are featured, such as Mark Prior, Dontrelle Willis, and Scott Podsednik. Some are rehabbing from injuries, while other players have trouble adjusting to the grind that is the minor leagues. Few days off, travel by bus instead of chartered planes, and salaries that are not bad, but only a small fraction of what they’re used to. Players are more rivals than teammates, but news of a call up to the major leagues is still greeted with cheers. Cubs Hall of Fame player Ryne Sandberg has worked his way up the managing ranks of the minor leagues, and finally gets to manage the Philadelphia Phillies. His story is quite memorable, as is that of young umpire Mark Lollo, who is either going to get called up to the major leagues soon, or his contract won’t be renewed. Managing at the Triple A level can be especially challenging because of last-minute call ups of starting pitchers and catchers. Some players travel up and down the leagues so many times in a season that it seems like they’re always playing catch up in an airport trying to get to their next game, while other players wonder if they’ll ever get to bat in the major leagues. A satisfying read for sports fans.

Brenda

 

Ultramarathon Man

ultramarathon manUltramarathon Man: Confessions of an All-Night Runner by Dean Karnazes

I’m not a runner, so why would I pick up a book titled Ultramarathon Man? I had recently seen the documentary of the same name about Dean Karnaze’s quest to run 50 marathons in 50 states in 50 days, and his family’s support of this challenge. I was curious about what makes Dean run and how he does it. The book takes place much earlier than the documentary, and talks about why someone might attempt endurance running. Dean had a happy upbringing until his sister died at 18. He ran one year of cross-country in high school, then stopped running when his coach left. He had a wife and a busy job at a corporation in San Francisco. Then he turned 30. After his birthday party, he literally started running all night. Running is clearly a stress reliever for Dean, and he likes the solitude. But it’s also a huge challenge and isn’t always fun, even for him. He decides to see how far he can run, and participates in a 50 mile race, in preparation for the Western States 100-Mile Endurance Run. Along the way his wife Julie becomes a dentist, and they have two children. His family, including his Greek-American parents, are very supportive, and act as support crew on his races. He shares the agonies of long-distance running with the readers, the blisters and cramps, thirst, dizziness and more. A more entertaining part is how he fuels his runs, including getting pizza and cheesecake delivered to him along an empty highway, and eating them on the run. He runs for charity, but also to make his life more meaningful and fulfilled. He feels most alive when he runs, especially at night, continuing to work during the day. I still don’t know how he does it, although I have learned that ultramarathons (any race longer than 26.2 miles) have become increasingly popular and even runners in their 60s compete. The book really kept my interest and I wanted to find out what Dean would attempt next. How about running a marathon to the South Pole? Affirmative. For more about Dean and endurance running, visit his website.

Brenda