Plaid & Plagiarism

plaid-jacketPlaid & Plagiarism by Molly MacRae

This book is an appealing beginning to a new cozy mystery series set in the Scottish Highlands. Librarian Janet, her daughter Tallie, and two of their friends buy a bookshop in Inversgail with plans to open a tearoom next door and a B & B upstairs. Making a quick visit to Janet’s house to see why her move has been delayed, Christine finds the kitchen full of trash while Summer, a reporter, finds a dead body in the garden shed. Later they find a biscuit tin full of threatening letters at the bookshop, which were probably written by the victim, advice columnist Una Graham. I found the four women a bit difficult to tell apart at first, but it was interesting having four amateur sleuths working together on the same case. There are plenty of descriptions of learning to run a bookshop, remodel a tearoom, and plenty of local colour, although sadly no scone recipes. A good start to the Highland Bookshop series, with some room for improvement.
Brenda

A Man Called Ove

ove jacketA Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman

Ove, a newly retired railway worker in Sweden, can fix many things, but not his heart. He is grumpy yet loveable, and doesn’t see the point in living without his wife Sonja or his job. Gradually Ove finds out that he is needed: first to back up a trailer, then to fix a radiator and a ceiling fan, to rescue a cat, drive neighbors to the hospital, and even to give driving lessons. His new neighbors, Parvaneh and Patrick, along with their two young daughters, help Ove break out of his shell. Gradually the reader sees that there’s more to Ove than complaining about rule-breakers and government bureaucrats, and learns about his childhood and his unlikely marriage to always late Sonja, as well as regular feuds with neighbor Rune, who prefers Volvos to Saabs. It took me quite a while to warm up to this book of mixed sadness, warmth, and humor, but I’m very glad I kept reading until I did. A movie, hugely popular in Sweden, may be coming to this country soon, and Ove is sure to gain more fans when it does. Readalikes include The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry, Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand, and The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry.
Brenda

The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend

broken wheel jacketThe Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend by Katarina Bivald

Sara Lindqvist arrives in Hope, Iowa for a long visit with her pen pal, Amy. Amy never shows up to drive her to Broken Wheel, and Sara arrives at her home just in time for Amy’s wake. Oddly, the residents of the tiny town in Southern Iowa want her to stay in Amy’s house, eat up all the casseroles, and get driven wherever she wants to go by lonely George. She is invited to the local bar to meet the town’s only eligible bachelor, Tom. No one will let her pay for her meals, drinks, or groceries. Once she gets to know Amy’s friends, Sara wants to give back to the town, and opens a small bookstore in a vacant storefront, stocking it mostly with Amy’s large collection of books. Sara generally prefers books to people, having worked in a bookstore in Sweden for years, but that could change. When a newsletter promotes the bookstore, the shop and the local bar fill up with tourists from Hope. The residents of Broken Wheel hope that maybe Sara will stay. Charming, quirky, and endearing, this is already popular with staff here at the library. I listened to the audiobook, with Sara’s part read by Fiona Hardingham, and the Iowans given a southern accent by Lorelei King, which only added to my reading enjoyment. This is a first novel by a Swedish writer who had only visited Iowa in books before this book was published.
Brenda

The Sparrow Sisters

sparrow jacketThe Sparrow Sisters by Ellen Herrick

An unusual first novel, an excellent readalike for Sarah Addison Allen fans. Set in a seaside town on Cape Cod, the three Sparrow Sisters run a plant nursery, and youngest sister Patience makes herbal remedies for the town. When doctor Henry Carlyle moves to Granite Point, he is skeptical of Patience’s talents. Neither Nettie nor Sorrel has ever married, and the three sisters live in the house they grew up in. When tragedy strikes, Patience’s remedies come under suspicion, and many of the men in Granite Point turn against the sisters. Magical realism is strong but never stated in this book, as Patience’s moods seem to affect the whole town, just like her ancestor Eliza Howard. In spite of the turmoil, one sister falls in love and another gains an admirer. The tone of the book changes, which makes for an unsettling reading experience. I’m expecting small town charm, quite a bit about plants, some romance and magic, and that’s what the first half of the book is like. Then it turns darker, melancholy and suspenseful, with the ending rather uncertain. But that makes for a memorable book, with more depth than a typical cozy mystery or romance.
Brenda

The All-Girl Filling Station’s Last Reunion

filling station jacketThe All-Girl Filling Station’s Last Reunion by Fannie Flagg

After marrying off her three daughters, Sookie Poole longs for some peace and quiet. But she can’t keep blue jays from emptying her bird feeders, and her demanding, eccentric mother Lenore lives down the street in Point Clear, Alabama. When Sookie learns that she was adopted in Texas, is actually 60 instead of 59, and that her birth mother was from the Polish town of Pulaski, Wisconsin, her world is turned upside down. Sookie pretends to have the flu to keep her mother away while she learns more about her fascinating birth family, supported by her kind husband Earle. Fritzi Jurdabralinski’s father opens a filling station in the 1930s, and builds an air strip nearby. Fritzi learns to fly a plane and does some wing walking, before she and her three sisters are needed to run the filling station. Three of the sisters, along with their brother, end up as pilots during World War II; much of their experiences are told in letters. Sookie doesn’t feel like she’s accomplished much with her life, but learning about her birth family inspires her. I think Lenore was a bit too eccentric to be believable, but this was a very enjoyable, heartwarming book.
Brenda

First Frost

first frost jacketFirst Frost by Sarah Addison Allen

First Frost is a pleasant, mostly gentle read that may make you hungry. I didn’t realize at first that it’s a sequel to the author’s first book, Garden Spells, set ten years later in Bascom, North Carolina. Claire is living in the house she inherited from her Waverley grandmother, but now makes candy with edible flowers instead of catering. Her niece Bay enjoys helping out, but Claire is increasingly tense. The Waverley women all have minor magical talents. Elderly cousin Evanelle gives people unusual gifts they may need later, such as a spatula. Claire’s affinity is for flowers and cooking, while her sister Sydney is a wonderful hair stylist. But Claire’s young daughter seems quite ordinary. Bay knows where some people and things belong, making her a great organizer, but when she gives Josh a note telling him that he belongs in her life, he doesn’t know how to respond. When a stranger in town tries to convince Claire that she’s not really a Waverley, it takes the magic of first frost, when their apple tree blooms, to set things to rights. It’s nice to visit with the Waverleys again, and Bay is an appealing narrator, but I wanted more back story to remind me what happened in the first book. Actually, I’d really like a book set earlier than First Frost. Complaints aside, this was a very enjoyable book to read, and I will probably re-read Garden Spells.
Brenda

Robyn Carr’s Virgin River

Robyn Carr’s Virgin River is a fictional village set in northern California, but it feels real. The bestselling, award-winning, romance series is up to 19 titles, with another coming out in November. I have read three books scattered throughout the series and expect I’ll read more: Shelter Mountain, Paradise Valley, and Harvest Moon. I’ve had to replace most of the books for the library’s collection as they have worn out. What makes these books so appealing? The cozy small town setting, romances that continue on throughout the series, plots that don’t wrap up neatly in a single book, characters that continue to change and grow, and heal. I would describe them as romances that readers of cozy mystery series might enjoy. The people who come to Virgin River tend to have medical or military backgrounds, and many are wounded in body or soul, and have come to Virgin River to start over. Here, they find friends, new jobs, hang out at the bar, and often get married and have babies, then welcome other members of their family to town. For lots more about the series and characters, visit the author’s website. The Virgin River books are:

1. Virgin River

2. Shelter Mountain

3. Whispering Rock

4. A Virgin River Christmas

5. Second Chance Pass

6. Temptation Ridge

7. Paradise Valley

8. Forbidden Falls

9. Angel’s Peak

10. Moonlight Road

11. Promise Canyon

12. Wild Man Creek

13. Harvest Moon

14. Bring Me Home for Christmas

15. Hidden Summit

16. Redwood Bend

17. Sunrise Point

There are also two novellas in That Holiday Feeling and Midnight Kiss.

Brenda