Brain Storm

Brain Storm by Elaine Viets

The author of two cozy mystery series set in St. Louis and Florida had her life changed by stroke a few years ago. Brain Storm introduces death investigator Angela Richman, working at crime scenes near St. Louis. Severe headaches make it difficult to do her work at the scene of a deadly car crash involving wealthy teens. At the emergency room of the local hospital, neurosurgeon Porter Gravois sends her home, saying she’s too young for a stroke. All too soon, his rival Dr. Jeb Travis Tritt saves Angela’s life with surgery and an induced coma after she has a series of strokes. A long recovery motivates her to investigate a suspicious death in the hospital cafeteria, but her faulty memory doesn’t help. Suspenseful with occasional flashes of humor, this is a promising new series, and should appeal to readers of Kathy Reichs. The author recently completed a death investigator training course in St. Louis, adding authenticity. A sequel, Fire and Ashes, has just been published.
Brenda


August 2017 Book Discussion

On August 22 at 7:00 pm, the Tuesday Evening Book Group will meet to discuss the novel Let Him Go, by Larry Watson. This novel, set in North Dakota and Montana in 1951, is both tender and violent, like a mid-century Western, and may appeal to readers of Kent Haruf and Ivan Doig. A couple is worried about their young grandson after their widowed daughter-in-law remarried and moved away. Larry Watson is best known for his novel Montana 1948.

The Tuesday Morning Group and the Crime Readers will meet again in September, while the Tuesday Evening Group takes September off.

Brenda


Camino Island

Camino Island by John Grisham

Perfect for vacation reading, this entertaining thriller has a devilishly clever plot that keeps the pages turning. A well-planned heist of five rare manuscripts by F. Scott Fitzgerald from Princeton University opens the story. Months later, with the FBI still investigating, a private company contacts Mercer Mann, a young English instructor, with an intriguing offer. If she spends a few months on Camino Island mingling with the literary community, her college loans will be paid off and she’ll have the time to work on her long overdue second novel. Mercer spent several summers on the Florida island, but hasn’t returned since her grandmother’s sudden death. Mercer is asked to get close to island bookseller Bruce Cable, and to try to get a look at his rare book vault in the basement. The local and visiting writers get together often for drinks and to talk about writing and publishing. Mercer spends much of her time walking and sunning on the beach, and is still struggling to find a book plot. Soon enough, the thieves and book dealers connect. The FBI wants to arrest the thieves, while Princeton’s insurance company is focused on getting the manuscripts returned, and Mercer struggles to do the right thing.

Brenda


The Swans of Fifth Avenue

The Swans of Fifth Avenue by Melanie Benjamin

Rich New York socialites are befriended by writer Truman Capote in the 1950s. Truman is openly gay, so their husbands don’t mind having him around on their yachts and in their villas. Babe Paley, Gloria Guinness, Pamela Churchill Harriman, and Slim Keith freely confide in him; only C.Z. Guest doesn’t share her secrets. Twenty years later, Truman reveals their secrets in a fictionalized article for Esquire, with grave consequences. The author explores the lives and relationships of these glamorous women and the colorful writer, best known for his book In Cold Blood and a remarkable black and white ball. Gossipy, entertaining, yet often sad, this novel is a compelling read.
Brenda


Grit

Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance by Angela Duckworth

In this engaging book, the author, a psychologist, demonstrates that the secret to success may not be intelligence or natural talent, but grit. Develop a passion, have a goal, and work hard. The author interviewed Jeff Bezos’ mother and the coaches of the Seattle Seahawks football team, estimated which cadets would succeed in their first year at West Point, and found what habits and attitudes help Spelling Bee contestants reach the finals. Learning to work and succeed at something hard, such as music lessons, sports, or ballet may make it more likely that a student will succeed in the future. For parents, she suggests that participating in an extracurricular activity (or two) for at least one year and preferably two may help them succeed in college. There is a quiz to find out how gritty you are, and assurances that you can build grit, as well as intelligence. Many interesting examples make for a good readalike for Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell and The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg.
Brenda


Dinner with Edward

Dinner with Edward: A Story of an Unexpected Friendship by Isabel Vincent

Isabel, an investigative reporter for the New York Post, is befriended by her colleague’s father, Edward. They both live on Roosevelt Island, in the East River. Edward was married to Paula for 69 years, and promised before her death to keep on living. Happily, he’s a gourmet cook, and Isabel starts visiting weekly for dinner and advice. Edward tells stories about his life, shares his poetry, and turns Isabel into a foodie. She has moved many times with her husband and daughter, and her marriage is unraveling. In later chapters, Edward is visibly aging, while Isabel might be falling in love again. This charming memoir reads like fiction. I only wish that it were longer and included recipes.
Brenda


The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O.

The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O. by Neal Stephenson and Nicole Galland

Tristan Lyons recruits Boston linguist Melisande Stokes for a top secret government project, translating modern and ancient documents. Their research shows that magic did exist, but abruptly stopped in 1851. Mel gets absorbed into D.O.D.O. (so secretive that it’s months before she learns she works for the Department of Diachronic Operations) as the pair work with physicist Frank Oda and his wife Rebecca to build an ODEC. At first, the office memos and messages are just something to get through between Melisande’s diary and action scenes. As the pace picks up, the messages get funnier and wilder as the improbable becomes mundane, even as the acronyms pile up. The ODEC is a time travel machine that can only be operated by a witch, and the person sent through time by the witch arrives empty handed and naked. Melisande tries repeatedly to acquire a rare book to help fund their work, Tristan learns to fence, an Irish witch plots to stop the end of magic, Vikings plunder Wal-Mart, and Melisande gets stuck in Victorian London, close to the ending of magic. A complicated, mostly entertaining, and lengthy tale that blends technology, history, and fantasy, along with a good dose of humor.
Brenda