March 2018 Book Discussions

The Tuesday Morning book group will meet at 10 am on March 20 to discuss On Turpentine Lane, by Eleanor Lipman, an enjoyable contemporary novel. Here’s my recent review.

The Tuesday Evening Book Group will discuss When the English Fall, by David Williams, at 7 pm on March 27. This is a post-apocalyptic novel, set in an Amish community near Lancaster, Pennsylvania. A compelling, beautifully written novel; here’s my earlier review.

The Crime Readers gather at Home Run Inn Pizza in Darien at 7 pm on Thursday, March 15 to discuss The Ghost, by Robert Harris. In this thriller, a ghost writer working on the memoir of a British politician finds out too many secrets. Meet at 6 pm for an optional dinner. The Crime Readers are co-sponsored by the Indian Prairie Public Library.

Copies of the books are available four weeks in advance at the Adult & Teen Services Reference Desk.

Enjoy!

Brenda

 


Fortune’s Pawn

Fortune’s Pawn by Rachel Bach

Mercenary Deviana Morris wants to join the Devastators, the King’s own guard on Paradox. To gain experience, she takes her high-tech suit of powered armor and applies for a position as security guard on the unlucky Terran trading ship Glorious Fool. Attracted by the handsome ship’s cook Rupert, she is stunned to meet the ship’s doctor, a potentially dangerous xith’cal. Fast-paced and entertaining, with a kick-ass heroine who’s curious, stubborn, loyal, and passionate, this book will appeal to fans of military science fiction or space opera. This is the first book in the Paradox trilogy, followed by Honor’s Knight. The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet by Becky Chambers is a good readalike, along with books by Elizabeth Moon and David Weber.

Brenda


Manhattan Beach

Manhattan Beach by Jennifer Egan

As a girl, Anna Kerrigan visits Manhattan Beach with her father Eddie, and meets Dexter Styles, who has ties to the Syndicate. The sea calls to the three of them, and to Anna’s sister Lydia. Years later, Eddie is missing, Dexter owns a nightclub, and Anna has a tedious job at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. Anna competes to be a diver at the Navy Yard, and pursues Dexter for answers about her father. We learn about Eddie’s adventures at sea, and the secrets the characters all have. While there are tender family scenes, the focus is on work, and on coworkers and crewmates. Anna takes risks and craves adventure, wanting to contribute to the war effort, reinventing herself more than once. Plenty of danger and intrigue add to the intensifying pace, leading to a surprisingly satisfying conclusion, with complex, memorable characters. Widely acclaimed, it’s a pleasure to read a book that lives up to high expectations. The first historical novel from award-winning novelist Egan, this is sure to be popular with book discussion groups.

Brenda


Walking the Americas

Walking the Americas by Levison Wood

Levison Woods, former British Army paratrooper, takes readers on another adventure, this time with Mexican photographer Alberto Caceres. They hike from Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula, where Cortes landed in 1519 all the way through Central America to the Colombian border in South America. Eight countries, 1800 miles, in just over four months, including the dangerous jungle of Panama’s Darien Gap, visited by Balboa in 1513. The sense of adventure and occasional danger is a little artificial when I know that Wood has a support team and is filming a documentary mini-series, but the accomplishment is still impressive. Each country makes a different impression on Wood, from the people and culture to the landscape and food. While spider bites and river crossings are a real danger, along with quicksand and snakes, walking along sections of the highway for part of their journey seems the greatest hazard. There are funny parts, some awesome scenery, and the occasional silly mistake. Wood has previously hiked the Himalayas and walked along the Nile River, and his latest hike has been circumnavigating the Arabian Peninsula.
Wood’s adventures make very entertaining armchair travel reading, especially as Wood hikes through parts of Central America rarely seen by tourists.

Brenda


On Turpentine Lane

On Turpentine Lane by Eleanor Lipman

Faith Frankel’s life is rather chaotic. Her boyfriend Stuart proposed with a ring made of red thread and set off to walk cross-country, posting frequent selfies in bars and with former girlfriends. Her father has left her mother and is painting faux Chagalls for bar mitzvahs. Faith is in some trouble at the private school where she works, supported only by coworker Nick Franconi. And the small house she’s impulsively purchased at a bargain price may have more history then she can handle, with one or more suspicious deaths. I enjoyed this frank and funny look at work, love, and family relationships, with great dialogue, appealing characters, and some very funny scenes. Enjoy!

Brenda

 


The Trouble with Goats and Sheep

The Trouble with Goats and Sheep by Joanna Cannon

Part mystery, part coming-of-age story, this first novel is set during the British heat wave of 1976. One Monday, Mrs. Margaret Creasy goes missing, and Grace Bennett, her 10-year-old neighbor, decides to investigate, along with her friend Tilly. They visit all the neighbors on their street, even Walter Bishop in #11, who has been shunned after being suspected of stealing a baby. Flashbacks to 1967 reveal some of the villagers’ secrets, but don’t solve the mystery. A possible image of Jesus captures the neighborhood’s attention at the peak of the heat wave, and almost everyone, even the new Indian family from Birmingham, gathers in the shade to visit and play canasta. I thought the plot quite clever, with some twists, and I enjoyed the occasional humorous scenes, the refreshingly ordinary girls, and the 1976 English village setting.

Brenda


February 2018 Book Discussions

The Tuesday Morning Book Group will meet at 10 am on February 20 to discuss I Will Send Rain, by Rae Meadows, a novel set in Oklahoma during the early years of the Dust Bowl. I found it melancholy in tone rather than bleak, with richly drawn characters and lyrical writing. Here’s my earlier review.

On February 27 at 7 pm, the Tuesday Evening Book Group will discuss A Piece of the World by Christina Baker Kline, a historical novel by the author of The Orphan Train. Christina Olson has always lived in her family’s farmhouse in coastal Maine. A young Andrew Wyeth meets the family and paints his famous painting “Christina’s World”. My review is here.

The Crime Readers will discuss the thriller Never Go Back by Lee Child at 7 pm on Thursday, February 15. Co-sponsored by the Indian Prairie Public Library, the Crime Readers meet at Home Run Inn Pizza in Darien, and gather at 6 pm for an optional dinner.

Copies of the books are available at the Adult & Teen Services Reference Desk.

Brenda