Unsheltered

Unsheltered by Barbara Kingsolver

Finally, a book set in dual time periods where each story is well worth reading. Both are centered around a house in need of repairs in Vineland, New Jersey. Thatcher Greenwood is a science teacher with a young, materialistic wife and an eccentric neighbor who corresponds with Darwin. Willa and her gorgeous but impractical husband are struggling financially, while simultaneously caring for an elderly parent who swears in Greek and a new grandson. Willa looks for grant money to repair their historic house and learns about the town’s remarkable history. Somewhat preachy ecologically and bittersweet in tone, this is a pageturner in both time periods.
Brenda


The Word is Murder

The Word is Murder by Anthony Horowitz

Diana Cowper visits a London funeral home to plan her own funeral and is killed later the same day. Coincidence? Or is her involvement in a fatal car accident almost ten years ago connected? Perhaps her son Damian, a famous actor in Los Angeles, has an enemy. Hawthorne, a police consultant, investigates, and wants the author to observe his investigation and write a book about the case. Hawthorne is brusque, brilliant, and secretive, and Horowitz is intrigued. Very clever writing from a versatile author who’s tackled Agatha Christie in The Magpie Murders, Sherlock Holmes in The House of Silk, written a series of thrillers about a teenage spy, and whose next project is a James Bond book. Next year look for another Hawthorne book, The Sentence is Death. Rory Kinnear is an excellent narrator for the audiobook.

Brenda


Into the Storm

Into the Storm: Two Ships, a Deadly Hurricane, and an Epic Battle for Survival by Tristram Korten

This is the gripping story of how two cargo ships encountered Hurricane Joaquin in September, 2015. National Hurricane Center meteorologists began tracking a tropical depression that unexpectedly gained in strength and followed a very different path than usual for Atlantic storms. As the Coast Guard prepared, including helicopter crews stationed in the southern Bahamas, two ships tried, unsuccessfully, to stay away from the storm. Delays in getting current weather reports and a lack of the most up-to-date safety features proved disastrous for one older ship, while dramatic rescue attempts by a highly trained helicopter rescue crew showed the resilience of another ship’s crew, making for compelling reading. This is a good readalike for The Perfect Storm by Sebastian Junger and Isaac’s Storm by Erik Larson.

Brenda

 


The Recipe Box

The Recipe Box by Viola Shipman

Sam Nelson, a young pastry chef, takes her family’s Michigan apple orchard for granted, and thinks she’ll be happier in New York City. Home for a visit, the key to her recipe box unlocks the stories of her mother Deanna, grandmother Willo, and great-grandmother at turning points in their lives. Recipes are included, and not just for apple-themed treats. A visit from her friend Angelo helps Sam see the orchard and the beautiful Leelanau Peninsula in a new light. This charming gentle read had me looking up apple orchards in the area, and may have other readers trying some of the recipes or planning a visit to Michigan’s Traverse Bay area.
Brenda


Starless

Starless by Jacqueline Carey

I really enjoyed reading this lush, compelling, standalone fantasy. Richly detailed with a strikingly unusual narrator, this story definitely exceeded my expectations. Khai has been raised in the desert by the Brotherhood of Parkhun, chosen to be the shadow or protector of a royal princess born the same day. Khai is trained by warriors and a thief, as well as an unlikely seer, facing his first opponent at age 9. Khai’s gender is non-binary, but that’s not a spoiler to anyone but Khai. The princess Zariya, youngest child of a very long lived king, has some physical problems from a childhood illness, but is brilliant, beautiful, and strong-willed. Later the pair journey across their starless, island-filled world in search of answers to a prophecy and companions to help in their quest. One reviewer compared their quest to Tolkien, but it reminded me more of The Voyage of the Dawn Treader by C.S. Lewis. The gods are creatively depicted, and include a giant octopus who’s an oracle. Giant sea worms tow their ship, and not all their companions are human. This is the first book I’ve read by Jacqueline Carey; I may try her Kushiel series next.

Brenda


Joyful

Joyful: The Surprising Power of Ordinary Things to Create Extraordinary Happiness by Ingrid Fetell Lee

I enjoyed reading about how small, joyful moments can lift our mood and make our day.  The author describes how  seemingly ordinary objects or experiences like balloons, confetti, rainbows, circles, flowers, and vibrant yet harmonious decor can spark joy while sharp edges, minimalist decor and clutter can make us edgy and uncomfortable. It’s certainly pleasant reading that may make me take an extra moment to enjoy a sunset or a butterfly.

Brenda

 


Red Waters Rising

Red Waters Rising by Laura Ann Gilman

Isobel is riding with her mentor Gabriel, exploring the hot, humid southern portion of the Devil’s West, in the third book of the trilogy which began with Silver on the Road. Isobel is the young Left Hand of the territory; arbitrator and sometimes enforcer in this magical land. As Isobel and Gabriel approach the Mudwater River (aka the Mississippi), everyone they meet seems increasingly uneasy. Gabriel is feeling the call of the River while Isobel may be too closely connected to the land of the territory. In the city of Red Stick they may be facing a riot, or another flood. An imaginative, well-drawn book set in an alternate 19th century North America, which leaves room for more stories in the Devil’s West.

Brenda