Paris for One

Paris for One & Other Stories by Jojo Moyes

A thoroughly enjoyable collection of eight short stories and a novella, set in England and Paris. All the stories are told by women, while the novella gives two points of view. Nell, who gives talks on risk assessment, splurges on a long weekend in Paris, surprising her boyfriend Pete. When Nell arrives in Paris alone, she would prefer to stay in her hotel room all weekend, except that she’s unexpectedly sharing her room with an American woman, and there’s no room service. With help from a hotel receptionist and handsome waiter Fabien, Nell takes a chance and explores Paris. An employee stays calm during a jewelry store robbery with startling results, another woman finds someone has switched gym bags and left her expensive high heeled shoes behind, and Chrissie finds a kind London cabbie giving her a new perspective on Christmas shopping for her unappreciative family. I really enjoyed the novella and hope that the author turns some of the short stories into novellas or novels. I listened to the audiobook, and enjoyed Fiona Hardingham’s narration of these appealing, humorous, and heartwarming stories.
Brenda

 


The Dream Gatherer

The Dream Gatherer by Kristen Britain

This book has a novella and two short stories written to celebrate the 20th anniversary of Green Rider, first book in a fantasy series featuring Karigan G’ladheon. This is also a good place to start reading the series. Green Riders have minor magical talents and are called to serve as the King’s messengers. Estral, Karigan’s friend, narrates these tales. Lost on the road, she visits Seven Chimneys, where the Berry sisters are coping with a ship that has materialized in the middle of their house and use a dream lantern to draw dreamers to a party. The other stories tell some of the history and legend of Sacoridia. If you’re in the mood for compelling fantasy writing with some suspense and humor but don’t have the time for a long epic, this is an excellent choice.

Brenda


Educated

Educated by Tara Westover

Tara never attended school before she got a scholarship at 17 to Brigham Young University. She also studied at Harvard and Cambridge, earning a Ph.D. in history. This is her remarkable story of struggle, survival, and achievement. The youngest of seven children raised in rural Idaho by a Mormon survivalist and a homeopathic midwife, Tara was taught to read and to work. I was angry at her parents for neglecting her education, endangering her life in their junkyard and on overnight car trips, but also for not protecting her from an abusive sibling. Remarkably, two of her brothers also have Ph.D.s and helped Tara escape the mountains and learn to tell her story. Compulsively readable and utterly heartwrenching, this memoir is a good readalike for Jeannette Walls’ books.
Brenda


Merry and Bright

Merry and Bright by Debbie Macomber

Two coworkers unknowingly connect on a dating website and start chatting online daily. Merry Knight is a data entry temp at a Seattle firm, saving money to finish college. Due to a human resources mistake, her name tag says Mary. Jason Bright, nicknamed Jay, is a vice-president in his uncle’s firm, and isn’t very nice when asking data entry staff to work overtime or take down holiday decorations. Jay/Jason was a lonely rich kid sent to boarding schools and summer camps; his cousin Cooper is his only friend. Merry/Mary lives with her parents and adores her 18-year-old brother Patrick, who has Down Syndrome. Merry’s love for Christmas is contagious, but things go badly when the online pair agree to meet in person. I enjoyed the narration of the audiobook by Em Eldridge, with alternating chapters from his and her points of view, but it was confusing telling Mary and Merry apart. Light and cozy, this is a charming holiday read.

Brenda


November 2018 Book Discussions & National Reading Group Month

On November 20 at 10 a.m., the Tuesday Morning Book Group will meet to discuss Before the Fall by Noah Hawley. This is a contemporary thriller about a small plane crash off the coast of New England. We know that there will be survivors, but not who they are or why the plane crashed. My earlier review is here.

The Tuesday Evening Book Group will meet at 7 p.m. on November 27 to discuss Less, by Andrew Sean Greer. This is the poignant and funny contemporary novel that unexpectedly won the Pulitzer Prize. Here’s my review.

The Crime Readers will meet at 6 p.m. for an optional dinner at Home Run Inn Pizza in Darien, and will discuss Sidney Chambers and the Shadow of Death by James Runcie at 7 p.m.

Copies of the books are available now at the Circulation Desk.

Stop in the library to see a display of discussible books for National Reading Group Month. Handouts include lists of book group suggestions from Indie Next and the Women’s National Book Association. I am planning winter and spring book discussions and find these lists helpful. Happy reading!

Brenda


An Absolutely Remarkable Thing

An Absolutely Remarkable Thing by Hank Green

April becomes a celebrity after she encounters a large metallic statue late one night in Manhattan. Her friend Andy records a video with April and the statue they nickname Carl, and the video goes viral. Sixty-four identical statues have appeared in cities around the world, including one in Hollywood. April gets a publicist and makes the rounds of talk shows, yet doesn’t know how to maintain her relationship with Maya. April, now known as April May, has plenty of adventures trying to solve the mystery of the Carls. While she definitely has some weaknesses, April thinks the Carls are benevolent, and has high hopes for the future. Fast-paced and entertaining, this first novel is a compelling, quirky read. More, please!

Brenda


Northland

Northland: A 4,000 Mile Journey Along America’s Forgotten Border by Porter Fox

Porter Fox spent three years exploring the northern border of the lower forty-eight states with Canada. Raised in Maine, he begins in the waters off the coast of Maine and travels the 4,000 mile border by canoe, freighter, car, and on foot. Along the way to the Peace Arch in Blaine, Washington, he describes the scenery and history of the border region, and talks with many of the border residents, border patrol agents, and visits the Standing Rock pipeline protestors in North Dakota. Some border residents have been used to commuting across the border for work, school, or shopping and are finding the border harder to cross in recent years. Some of the most interesting chapters were a freighter voyage across four of the Great Lakes and canoeing and camping in the Boundary Waters. I found this book to be a good mix of history, scenery, and armchair travel.
Brenda