Among the Living

Among the Living by Jonathan Rabb

Yitzhak Goldah arrives in Savannah in 1947 to stay with his cousins Abe and Pearl Jesler. They are very welcoming, nickname him Ike, and introduce him to their friends at the Conservative synagogue. Goldah, 31, worked as a journalist in Prague, and is a Holocaust survivor. He starts working at Abe’s shoe store, where he meets widowed Eve, daughter of the local newspaper owner, who attends the Reform temple. African Americans are second class citizens in post war Savannah, and Goldah identifies more with Calvin and Raymond from the shoe store than the prosperous Jews, who first settled Savannah in 1733. The clash between the Conservative and Reform Jews is especially hard for Goldah to understand. Everything seems so normal and prosperous, as if the war never happened, although there’s a subplot about Abe Jesler getting shipments of Italian shoes through shady connections. A woman from Goldah’s past arrives, and they talk briefly about life during the war. The horror of their experience is not minimized, but isn’t the focus of this powerful, moving story about new beginnings. Savannah is vividly drawn, the story is well-crafted, and the characters seem real.

Brenda


June 2017 Book Discussions

The Tuesday Morning Book Group will  meet at 10 am on June 20 to discuss a book that was popular when the library was founded in 1967, Trustee from the Toolroom, by Nevil Shute. Published in 1960, this is the well-loved story of an British engineer who travels to the South Pacific to recover his young niece’s legacy. We will be meeting in the open area off the lobby, near the new books. Here’s a brief review about re-reading Nevil Shute.

On June 27 at 7 pm, the Tuesday Evening Book Group will discuss The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper, by Phaedra Patrick. This is a contemporary novel about a man who find’s his late wife’s charm bracelet on the first anniversary of her death. Arthur doesn’t remember Miriam wearing the bracelet, and calls the phone number on a bejeweled elephant charm. Here is my earlier review.

The Crime Readers are on break until September. Happy summer reading!

Brenda


The Soul of an Octopus

The Soul of an Octopus by Sy Montgomery

Naturalist Sy Montgomery, author of The Good Good Pig, meets a forty pound octopus named Athena, and becomes fascinated by octopuses. She becomes an octopus observer at the New England Aquarium in Boston and meets aquarists, interns, and volunteers who bond while an octopus wraps an arm or two around their arms, and while they stroke her soft head. Octopuses (not octopi) are intelligent, very curious, and capable of changing the color, pattern, and texture of their skin many times in an hour. Boneless, they can and will fit in very tiny places and try to escape from their tanks to explore the world. The suckers on their eight arms can smell and taste, and are both strong and flexible. Over a couple of years, Sy gets to know four giant Pacific octopuses in Boston, travels to Seattle to watch octopuses mating, and learns to scuba dive. Sy observes wild octopuses in the Caribbean and the South Pacific. Poignantly, she also watches a favorite octopus, Octavia, grow old. After reading this absorbing, moving memoir, I look forward to spending time at aquariums observing the amazing octopuses.

Brenda


The Way Life Should Be

The Way Life Should Be by Christina Baker Kline

Christina Baker Kline is best known for Orphan Train, her bestselling historical novel. Her new book, A Piece of the World, received lots of publicity, but I overlooked this appealing contemporary novel, published in 2007, until another librarian recommended it to me. Angela Russo, 33, an event planner in New York City, loses her job and heads to Maine to visit Rich, a guy she’s met only once. There’s not much to do on Mount Desert Island in the fall (except Acadia National Park, which barely gets a mention), and Angela starts working with Flynn at the local coffee shop. She rents a tiny shack, adopts a dog, and starts baking muffins and scones for the coffee shop. Angela inherited the gift of cooking from her Italian nonna, and hosts a few Italian cooking classes. Rich clearly isn’t her soul mate, but she’s surprisingly content. Back home in New Jersey for Christmas to visit her ailing nonna and the rest of her family, Angela has to decide whether to follow her head or her heart. Recipes are included, and they sound delicious. This is a good readalike for The City Baker’s Guide to Country Living, by Louise Miller, although Kline’s book is more cheerful.

Brenda


Way Station

Way Station by Clifford Simak

Enoch Wallace lives quietly on a farm in southwest Wisconsin. Except for serving in the Civil War, Enoch has lived in Wisconsin for all of his 140 years. Enoch, who looks 30, is given privacy by his neighbors, and his only regular contact is with the mailman. Well, his only human contact. Enoch runs a way station for interstellar travelers. He gets a message when to expect a visitor and what special requirements they have. Travel is by a sort of transporter. Enoch has regular visitors who have become friends, and this contact, along with his books and magazines make for a pretty satisfactory life. He also interacts with two 19th century holographic humans. The farmhouse has been remade to look old but is is impenetrable and basically indestructible. Enoch only ages when he leaves the farm house to take a daily walk around the property. One day a neighbor, a mute girl, needs his help, and his privacy is gone. Also, as is common in science fiction, the fate of the earth (and Enoch’s way station) is uncertain. A short, absorbing novel with a very likeable narrator; well worth reading. This novel was published in 1963, and won the Hugo Award in 1964.
Brenda                                                     


The Scribe of Siena

The Scribe of Siena by Melodie Winawer

Medieval Italy comes to life in this debut historical novel about a neurosurgeon who time travels. Beautifully detailed descriptions of the people, places, and food of modern and 14th century Siena add appeal to a moving story about love, loss, and the Plague. Beatrice Trovato keeps meaning to visit her brother Ben, a historian, in Siena, but is too busy working as a neurosurgeon. Looking at her brother’s research about the history of Siena, exploring the city and its art, she travels back in time to 1347, the year before the Plague will arrive in Siena. Amazingly, she finds work as a scribe, and also meets widowed fresco painter Gabriele Accorsi, who’s a witness to a killing by one of the early Medicis. Beatrice, trying to figure out how to get home before the plague, falls in love with Gabriele and Siena. Readers who can accept the idea of time travel and some unlikely coincidences will be enchanted.

Brenda

 


Hotel

Hotel by Arthur Hailey

Published in 1965, this is a thriller about five eventful days at the St. Gregory Hotel in New Orleans. Peter McDermott, the assistant general manager, typically spends much of his time dealing with one crisis after another, as he’s responsible for keeping the hotel running smoothly, but can’t make major changes. Christine Francis, assistant to hotel owner Warren Trent, is a bright spot in his day, as is a distressed guest, Martha Preyscott. During the week, Peter deals with problems in the kitchen, an ill guest housed in the hotel’s worst room, a convention of dentists threatening to leave, a thief, and the looming threat of the hotel being sold. Tycoon Curtis O’Keefe is visiting with his sweet girlfriend Dodo, and is deciding if the St. Gregory will become part of his bland, efficient, and impersonal chain of hotels. The city is briefly but vividly described, with most of the focus on a back stage view of the hotel, from the kitchens to the elevators to the incinerator room, offices, and parking garage. A hotel staff member is blackmailing guests who may be connected to a hit and run, and Peter can only how he’d like to run the hotel. An elevator accident, hinted at early in the book, brings the novel to a dramatic close. While somewhat dated, this is still a plot-driven page turner with just enough background on the minor characters to give them appeal without slowing the intensifying pace.
Brenda