To Be Where You Are

To Be Where You Are by Jan Karon

It’s always enjoyable to visit Mitford, North Carolina, home of Father Tim and his artist wife, Cynthia. This time around, readers get to catch up on most of the town’s residents, and visit young veterinarian Dooley and his wife at their busy animal clinic a few miles outside Mitford. In town, everyone seems to have a big life event, from writing a book, riding in a parade, buying an RV, adopting a pet, to having a baby. Retired Father Tim helps out at the local grocery store when the owner gets sick, and puts off taking Cynthia on a big road trip. So, no real plot, just a very pleasant visit with the folks in Mitford. The first book in the long cozy series is At Home in Mitford.

Brenda

 


Artemis

Artemis by Andy Weir

Jazz Bashara, born in Saudi Arabia, has grown up in the Moon’s only city, Artemis. She’s just getting by, delivering packages and the occasional contraband, sleeping in a capsule berth and eating Gunk. When she’s offered a large reward to vandalize a refinery, the pace revs up as Jazz starts down a slippery slope, taking the reader on a wild ride as she gets creative and enlists an unlikely group to save Artemis from disaster. While the plots differ, Marina in New Moon by Ian McDonald and Bet Yeager in C.J. Cherryh’s Rimrunners have a lot in common with Jazz, using all their skills to survive in a hostile environment. This book was fun to read; I really enjoyed the unusual, well-detailed setting.
Brenda

 


November 2017 Book Discussions

It’s strange to be writing about November discussions when it’s warm and sunny outside. The Tuesday Morning Book Group will meet at 10am on November 21 to talk about Lab Girl: A Story of Trees, Science, and Love by Hope Jahren, a memoir on several best books of 2016 lists, including mine.

On November 28 at 7pm the Tuesday Evening Book Group will discuss The Second Mrs. Hockaday, by Susan Rivers, a historical novel set during and after the Civil War.

On Thursday, November 16, the Crime Readers will meet at Home Run Inn Pizza in Darien to discuss The Round House, by Louise Erdrich. Co-sponsored by the Indian Prairie Public Library, the Crime Readers gather at 6 pm for optional dinner.

Copies of the books are available at the Adult & Teen Services Reference Desk.

Brenda


Jane, Unlimited

Jane, Unlimited by Kristin Cashore

As a big fan of Cashore’s previous novels—The Graceling Series—I have long awaited Jane, Unlimited. I was happy to rediscover her immersive writing style and strong, complex characters. Her newest book is more of mystery with a fantasy twist than her other straight fantasy novels. Jane arrives at “Tu Reviens” Mansion with her friend Kiran for a seasonal ball, but after a number of peculiar things happen—missing art pieces, overhead late night conversations, and the disappearances and reappearances of people—Jane begins wonder what is actually happening at the mansion. As the mystery unfolds, Jane reaches a point where she must decide how she will uncover the truth. This decision changes her future in ways Jane could never have imagined. Created in an interesting format, readers who enjoy mysteries, multiverses, or unearthing new discoveries will enjoy this book. It also gets bonus points for having diverse representation.

Sarah

(Welcome, Sarah!)


Provenance

Provenance by Ann Leckie

Provenance is about identity, history, value, and connections. While not as stunning as the award-winning Ancillary Justice and its sequels, this is a thoroughly absorbing, enjoyable return to that universe. The people on Hwae highly value vestiges, rare artifacts and collectible documents. Some of them may be forgeries, and others may be stolen. Family is key, with some politicians adopting children to vie for the chance to claim their parent’s position and name. Gender is key here, with e and eir often substituted for he/she and their. Ingray Aughskold has taken a big chance to secure her future by borrowing against her inheritance to rescue Pahlad Budrakim, a thief, from “Compassionate Removal”. The person she finds claims to be Garal Ket, not Pahlad. Ship captain Tic Uisine provides food and some clothing, but is temporarily stuck in port when the alien Geck claim his ship is stolen. Back on Ingray’s planet Hwae, her scheming brother Danach can’t believe Ingray’s been so daring. Soon a visiting diplomat is killed with Ingray, Garal Ket, Danach, and another diplomat present, along with an AI mech. Ingray gets caught up in one crisis after another, most notably when there’s a hostage crisis involving her parent and some children who were visiting the Lareum, a museum containing rare vestiges. Ingray is smarter, braver, and more creative than she realizes, although the reader catches on pretty quickly. Ingray’s friend Taucris, who doesn’t declare her gender and claim her family name until she’s an adult, certainly appreciates Ingray. Identity is also key, with Garal Ket/Pahlad, Gecks and human Gecks, AI mechs with false identities, and orphans having not quite the same status as foster children. Highly recommended for science fiction readers looking for an compelling, fast-paced novel, especially fans of C. J. Cherryh’s Foreigner series.
Brenda


Love and Other Consolation Prizes

Love and Other Consolation Prizes by Jamie Ford

Bookended by 1909 and 1962 world fairs in Seattle, biracial Chinese American Ernest Young tells the story of his coming of age in Seattle with his two friends, Fahn and Maisie. Ernest’s wife has been having memory issues, which may be improving. The trick is that we don’t know whether he married Fahn or Maisie, as his wife is called Gracie. Ernest’s mother was desperately poor, and arranged for him to take a freighter to America. After time at an orphanage and a boarding school, Ernest is to be raffled off at the Alaska Yukon Pacific Exposition in Seattle. Unexpectedly, he becomes the houseboy and later chauffer to Madame Flora, who runs an upscale house in Seattle’s red light district, where he meets her daughter Maisie and kitchen maid Fahn. I really enjoyed Ford’s first book, Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet, but I didn’t like this story or setting as well, even though the writing and characterization are excellent. Ernest is a very appealing character, more so than either Maisie or Fahn. The 1909 fair is more vividly described than the Century 21 Expo in 1962. I think Ford is an excellent writer, but I hope he picks a happier setting for his next book.
Brenda


Gap Year Girl

Gap Year Girl: A Baby Boomer Adventure across 21 Countries by Marianne Bohr

Marianne and her husband Joe are preparing to do what many dream about but few accomplish: take a year to explore Europe. They are turning 55, and their children, Chris and Caroline, have finished college. They sell their Maryland house after a year, and camp out with friends until it’s time to give notice at work, get their long-term French visas, and head for a studio apartment in Paris. Marianne loves all things French and is changing careers to become a French teacher, so Paris is where they start and end their year abroad, with a week in the middle to run the Paris Marathon. Joe, a marine engineer, doesn’t speak much French, but loves history and is willing to drive rental cars as needed. They run, hike, and canoe because they enjoy being active, but also to indulge their love of food and wine. I like Marianne’s writing style, sketching the places they visit in a few sentences, focusing on the people they encounter as well as the scenery. It’s easier to share what they didn’t enjoy in their whole year of travel: a lonely town in France, the markets in Morocco, and train stations in Austria. Otherwise, they find kind, helpful people wherever they go, along with wonderful food. They mix budget accommodations and picnic food with the occasional splurge, and get very tired of their limited wardrobe. Highlights include skiing with their children in Italy’s Dolomites, and hiking the Tour de Mont Blanc with a guide and other travelers. Greece wins the award for friendliest country.  In the end, Marianne’s favorite country is still France, although Joe likes the food in Italy best. A very enjoyable travel memoir.
Brenda