Cherokee America

Cherokee America by Margaret Verble

Cherokee America, known as Check, is a mother of five sons, running a farm in Indian Territory in 1875 while her husband Andrew is dying. She tries to spend time with all of her sons daily, from toddler to teenagers. Hired hand Puny goes missing, Check’s son Hugh is injured, and a man is killed. A young girl may have been kidnapped, and then a Cherokee man is killed, perhaps because of a rumor of hidden treasure. Check, her sons, their extended family and friends come together to mourn Andrew, search for the girl, and protect their neighbors when U.S. Marshalls come calling. This is an intricately plotted novel, with a strong sense of place, and a memorable female lead character. Not a fast read although there’s plenty of action compressed into a few weeks; this is a historical novel to savor.

Brenda

Early Riser

Early Riser by Jasper Fforde

This is an unusual, quirky book by the author of the Thursday Next series, set in an alternate Wales. Charlie Worthing has just joined the Winter Consul Service and heads out on his first assignment, only to get trapped in Sector 12 when the trains stop running. Winters are so long and bitterly cold that most people hibernate, bulking up before their long sleep. Some unfortunates turn into Nightwalkers, sort of zombies who can work menial jobs. Charlie has many adventures as he tries to make it through his first winter awake and investigates a viral dream about a blue Buick. Darkly humorous and witty with an appealing protagonist.

Brenda

Maid

Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay, and a Mother’s Will to Survive by Stephanie Land

This is an excellent debut memoir about a single mother struggling to provide for her young daughter, while dreaming of college in Missoula, Montana, and of becoming a writer. I think Stephanie is an amazing writer with a story that needed to be told. Readers will root for Stephanie and her young daughter Mia and cheer when they find a better apartment and finally visit Montana. Stephanie shares the insights gained by cleaning a variety of houses; a loving home in a studio apartment trumps a gorgeous house with a view. There is suspense when a car accident comes close to disaster for Mia and Stephanie, even without an injury. Deservedly popular, this is a candid look at a mother’s love for her daughter and how hard she works for their future, especially when the possibility of a grant or a tax refund helps her look beyond the end of a month. Readalikes include A Broom of One’s Own by Nancy Peacock and Nickel and Dimed by Barbara Ehrenreich. For more of Stephanie’s writings and story, visit her website.
Brenda

Pirate

Pirate: A Sam and Remi Fargo Adventure by Clive Cussler and Robin Burcell

I enjoyed listening to Scott Brick narrate this entertaining adventure novel. It really kept my interest on long drives. The first book I’ve read in the Sam & Remi Fargo series, it’s a little more violent than the Dirk Pitt series, but not violent compared to other thrillers. Wealthy treasure hunters Sam & Remi now run a charity but still enjoy a quest for treasure. An ongoing attempt to enjoy a peaceful vacation keeps getting interrupted by new clues or interference by their competitor, a typical villain. Remi is shopping for a rare book in South Carolina when the bookstore is held up. The Fargo’s research staff thinks the rare map in her book may be linked to the lost treasure of King John, who died in 1216. Their search takes them to Brazil, Jamaica, and England. Fast-paced and plot driven, Sam and Remi are good company wherever they go. Readers may also enjoy The Seven Deadly Wonders by Matthew Reilly or Robert Kurson’s real-life adventure The Pirate Hunters.
Brenda

 

The Golden Hour

The Golden Hour by Beatriz Williams

Perfect summer reading for fans of historical fiction. Lulu Randolph is in the Bahamas in 1941 as a correspondent for a New York magazine, secretly filing stories about the glamorous Duke and Duchess of Windsor. An unexpected romance with scientist Benedict Thorpe later leads Lulu to London and Switzerland. Alternate chapters tell the bittersweet story of Elfriede, suffering from post-partum depression in the Swiss alps, and her connection to Benedict’s family. History, royalty, war-time intrigue and romance make for an absorbing read; sure to be popular with book groups. This novel will be published on July 7.

Brenda

Wildwood

Wildwood by Elinor Florence

I thoroughly enjoyed this novel about Molly and her young daughter Bridget, who move from Phoenix to rural Alberta, Canada when Molly inherits a farm from her great aunt. Molly has just been laid off from her accounting job during the recent recession, and worries about four-year-old Bridget, who is extremely shy. The inheritance is contingent on Molly living on the farm for a year, including the long cold winter. Molly’s aunt left a journal about her life on the farm in 1924, as well as old photos, a cookbook, and other keepsakes. Molly and Bridget learn to live off the grid in the old farm house with a wood stove and a pump on the kitchen sink, driving a truck into town monthly to shop and use the internet. In the past, Mary Margaret and her husband are homesteaders, living in a large foursquare house built from a catalogue kit. There is a wonderful sense of place and very likable characters, although a romantic subplot isn’t well-developed. The author’s website has numerous photos that inspired the book, which is suggested for readers who enjoy character-focused novels or fiction set in rural North America. Enjoy!

Brenda