The Corner Shop

corner-shop-jacketThe Corner Shop by Elizabeth Cadell

When Lucille Abbey travels to Hampshire to find out why three of her best employees have left the job of private secretary to Professor Hallam, she finds that the cottage is at the top of a steep hill, lacks basic amenities, and that the professor is quite unreasonable. Lucille can handle the job, the cottage, and the professor, but is soon off to Paris for a “vacation”, running her aunt’s small shop while she’s away. It becomes apparent that Lucille’s aunt is dishonest, and acquaintances from London and Hampshire keep turning up in Paris. A charming, pleasant read, with some mystery and a little romance. This book was published in 1967, and is a bit dated. Why am I reading and reviewing it now? I have enjoyed other books by Elizabeth Cadell in the past, but I’m currently looking to read and review books that were popular 50 years ago, as the Woodridge Public Library is celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2017. Information on special events can be found on the library’s website. The library owns 15 novels by Elizabeth Cadell, and she’s always a good choice if you’re looking for a light, gentle read.

Happy New Year!
Brenda

50th-logo


January 2017 Book Discussions

marriage-of-opposites-jacketIn January, the Tuesday Morning Book Group will meet at 10am on January 17 to discuss The Marriage of Opposites, by Alice Hoffman, a biographical novel about Impressionist painter Camille Pissarro, and his parents, set on the island of St. Thomas and in Paris. Here’s my review.

The Tuesday Evening Book Group will discuss a memoir, Not Fade Away: A Memoir of Senses Lost and Found, by Rebecfade-away-jacketca Alexander. They will meet at 7 pm on January 24. When she was 19, Rebecca learned that she was gradually going deaf and blind. Undaunted, Rebecca became a psychotherapist, a spin instructor, and since finishing her memoir, climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro. Here’s my recent review.

The Crime Readers will be discussing The Tenderness of Wolves, by Stef Penney at 7 pm on Thursday, January 19, at Home Run Inn Pizza in Darien. The Crime Readers is co-sponsored by the Indian Prairie Public Library. Meet for optional dinner at 6 pm. Their selection is an award-winning historical novel set in the winter of 1867, on the Canadian frontier.

Copies of all three books are available at the Adult & Teen Services Reference Desk.tenderness-jacket


Updraft by Fran Wilde

updraft-jacketUpdraft by Fran Wilde

Kirit Densira lives in a remarkable world, high above the clouds, in towers made of living, growing bone. She is ready for her wing test, and hopes to be her mother’s apprentice. Ezarit is a trader who soars between towers. Kirit’s curiosity puts her in danger, and causes heavy penalties for her and her wing brother Nat. Kirit’s harsh singing voice may be surprisingly useful, and the Singers of the Spire want her to join them, but it’s hard to know who to trust. Full of adventure and intrigue, soaring heights and monsters in a suspenseful and compelling fantasy. I really enjoyed Kirit’s story, and look forward to reading about Nat in Cloudbound. I think fans of Anne McCaffrey’s Harper Hall trilogy, which begins with Dragonsong, would enjoy Updraft, which won the Andre Norton award.
Brenda


The River of No Return

ridgway-jacketThe River of No Return by Bee Ridgway

An absorbing first novel, in which Lord Nick Falcott, who is about to die in the battle of Salamanca in Spain in 1812, wakes up in a London hospital in 2003. The Guild have found him, and will spend a year acclimating him to the 21st century, then give him a pension and assign him a country. Time travelers can never return to their home country or time period. However, after enjoying life for several years in New England, Nick is summoned by the Guild, and sent back to his estate in England three years after he was declared dead, in order to help find a Guild enemy who is manipulating time nearby at Castle Dar. In 1815, Julia Percy’s grandfather is dying, and Castle Dar will be inherited by her cousin Eamon. Julia learns that she can freeze time and travels to London to stay with Nick’s sisters and mother. Nick and Julia are attracted to each other, but the Guild has other plans for Nick. Full of adventure, intrigue, romance, and rich in historical detail, the author leaves open the possibility of a sequel. This debut is a good readalike for A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness, Outlander by Diana Gabaldon, and the regency romance novels with a military focus by Carla Kelly.
Brenda

 


Butter: A Rich History and Paper: Paging Through History

butter-jacketButter: A Rich History by Elaine Khosrova

This short history of butter and butter making is a delicious read. Khosrova traveled around the world to watch butter being made and used, from sculpting butter cows in Iowa, to watching yaks being milked in Bhutan and discovering that yak butter tea made with fresh butter can be delicious. Butter has been made from the milk of camels, water buffaloes, goats, and sheep, as well as cows, for many thousands of years. Religious rituals using butter, superstitions about butter making, and a variety of churns are all described. The history of commercial butter making is included, along with butter’s possible health benefits and the mid-century battle of butter and margarine. Sadly, I grew up on margarine, but I don’t bake with it. I had no idea that butter has become trendy, tending to buy whatever brand of unsalted butter is on sale. I have recently sampled three premium butters: a sweet cream European style butter and cultured salted butters from Brittany and Wales. During a recent visit to a local chain supermarket, I found at least six more premium butters, including a two pound roll of Amish butter. A big box retailer has two selections, and a national chain of small grocery stores currently offers butter made from water buffalo milk with Himalayan sea salt. The butters I tried were all delicious, especially on bread. I will still use basic butter most of the time, but where butter is featured in a recipe, like shortbread cookies or puff pastry, I’m looking forward to using a richer tasting, lower moisture premium butter. Recipes from simple to sophisticated are included, including two methods for making your own butter. The author trained as a pastry chef, has worked as a food writer for a test kitchen, and edits a magazine about cheese. A long list of recommended butters is included. This is one of the most enjoyable microhistories I have read.

Paper: Paging Through History by Mark Kurlanskypaper-jacket

A long, leisurely read about the history of making and using paper, as well as papyrus and parchment. Wall screens, lanterns and lamp shades, kites, balloons, gun cartridges, and even clothing have been made from paper. One of the first uses of paper was to wrap food, and it’s long been used in prayer flags and to burn at religious ceremonies. The history of printing is also described, and the rise and fall of newspapers. Paper making involves a reliable supply of cold, running water, a large supply of linen or cotton rags or other plants, and skilled paper makers. With their arms constantly in cold water manipulating heavy frames, paper making was arduous work, but skilled workers could travel to another area to find work at another paper mill, or start a new mill. Over the centuries there has been a rising demand for paper, and also the plants or used cloth needed to make it. Surprisingly, paper wasn’t made from wood pulp until around 1850. The use of paper doesn’t seem to have declined in this century, and there is a renewed interest in handmade and other specialty papers for writing, painting, and drawing, and paper is still being made from a variety of materials. An interesting and informative microhistory, but not a page turner.

Brenda


Holiday Stories

Every year, November and December bring a new assortment of winter holiday stories. Most, but not all, are about Christmas, are usually short, and they are featured in a library display called “Heartwarming Holiday Stories.” If you’re looking for a pleasant holiday read, you’ll find plenty of books to browse. Here are short reviews of three new selections:

caramel-jacket

Christmas Caramel Murder by Joanne Fluke

In another delicious winter holiday mystery, cookie baker Hannah Swensen is looking back at the previous winter, telling a newcomer to Lake Eden a story about her business partner Lisa. Lisa is worried that her husband Herb is out late “working” every night, and is really upset when she doesn’t get to play Mrs. Claus to Herb’s Santa in a local Christmas show, and the very flirty Phyllis wears a rather revealing costume at the dress rehearsal. Shortly afterwards Hannah and Lisa find a body in a snowbank, near a bag of caramels that Lisa made. Hannah, an experienced amateur sleuth, works with detective Mike to find the killer. I didn’t try any of the dozen recipes included, but they sound delicious. A nice touch is that Hannah dreams of her father as the ghosts in Dickens’ Christmas Carol, and the ghosts give her some helpful hints. Suzanne Torren is an excellent narrator for the audiobook version.

amish-blessings-jacket

Amish Christmas Blessings

Amish holiday stories are very popular here, and this book features two novellas.  In The Midwife’s Christmas Surprise  by Marta Perry, young midwife Anna Zook is having trouble getting accepted in her Amish community as more than an assistant midwife. She is stunned when her friend’s son, Benjamin Miller, returns from three years in the “English” world.  In A Christmas to Remember by Jo Ann Brown, storekeeper Amos Stoltzfus is led to an injured woman by a little girl who can only tell them their names. Linda has lost her memory and can’t remember where she was taking the little girl. Short and sweet holiday romances make for a quick read.

Twelve Days of Christmas by Debbie Macomber

Julia works at a large department store, volunteers at a Boys and Girls Club playing piano, and needs to develop a popular blog for a chance at a corporate social media job. Julia’s friend encourages her to write about her grumpy neighbor Cain, and do something kind for him every day during the Christmas season. Cain turns down chocolate chip cookies and a free drink at his favorite coffee shop, so the kindness campaign is not starting out well. Then Cain gets sick, Julia meets his grandfather, and her blog takes off. What will happen if Cain finds out that she’s writing about him? This is a fun, heartwarming story with a little romance, and I didn’t mind that it was a bit predictable.        Brenda

twelve-days-jacket


Indestructible

indestructible-jacketIndestructible: One Man’s Rescue Mission that Changed the Course of WWII by John Bruning

Paul Gunn, a 41-year-old pilot working in Manila when Pearl Harbor was attacked, will do whatever it takes to help win the air war in the Pacific and get back to Manila to rescue his family. “Pappy” Gunn works to the point of exhaustion, even in ill health, to modify and improve planes sent to the Pacific, train pilots, lead low altitude bombing runs, and even threaten quartermasters at gunpoint to get the supplies his crews need. Back in Manila, his wife Polly and their four children stay with friends until they are forced to move to the internment camp at Santo Tomas, a former university. Polly eventually toughens up and helps her family by deceiving the camp’s Japanese officers, and persistently demands that her children receive the medical care and housing they need, even if it’s not at Santo Tomas. The Gunn children help guard the family’s possessions, steal and smuggle food, spy, and keep secret a hidden radio. Set in the Philippines, New Guinea, and Australia, the remarkable Gunn family’s adventures will keep the reader in suspense to find out what happens. Indestructible is a readalike for Unbroken, by Laura Hillenbrand, Lost in Shangri-La, by Mitchell Zuckoff, and 81 Days Below Zero, by Brian Murphy.
Brenda