January 2015 Book Discussions

On January 13* at 10:00 a.m., the Tuesday Morning Book Group will be discussing The Boys in the Boat: Nine boysboat jacketAmericans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics by Daniel James Brown. This is narrative non-fiction at its best, featuring the working-class student athletes and rowing coaches at the University of Washington striving to become Olympic champions. The coaches were looking to develop a crew of eight rowers and a coxswain who could learn to work as one unit, while the students were struggling to earn enough money during the Great Depression to stay in school.

ordinarygrace jacketOn January 20* at 7:00 p.m., the Tuesday Evening Book Group will be discussing Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger, a stand-alone mystery novel that has won three major awards. Death comes in several ways to New Bremen, Minnesota in the summer of 1961. 13-year-old Frank Drum, his father Nathan, a Methodist minister, and the rest of the family try to come to terms with the events of an unforgettable summer, dealing with grief, secrets, betrayal, and looking for a resolution.

The Crime Readers are meeting at Home Run Inn Pizza at 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 15 to discuss A Beautiful Place to Die by Malla Nunn, set in 1950s South Africa. Optional dinner at 6:00 p.m. The Crime Readers are co-sponsored by the Indian Prairie Public Library.

Copies of all three titles are available at the Adult/Young Adult Reference Desk.
Sign up online, by phone, or in person.

*Note different weeks. Both groups are meeting one week earlier than usual in January and February.

Brenda


Between Shades of Gray

ruta jacket

Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys

Between Shades of Gray is a harrowing story about a young girl, her family and her neighbors being forced from their home in Lithuania and imprisoned in a brutal Siberian encampment under Stalin’s rule. As one would expect, this wartime story is horribly sad and disturbing. However, there are moments in the imprisoned people’s lives where they remind one another that they are indeed compassionate human beings who are capable of empowering themselves and one another by sharing happy and peaceful memories. These moments better enable them to survive–spiritually and physically. On one occasion the “prisoners” free themselves from several months of endless burden and physical wear with the use of what can be called, collective memory. They secretly gather on Christmas Eve and recreate a scene that resembles a traditional Lithuanian Christmas dinner celebration—Kucios. During this commemoration they have only the small stolen rations of stale food from the farming camp that they are temporarily enslaved at. Yet, with these very limited means the group manages to capture the spirit of the holiday celebration, perhaps in a more powerful manner than any Christmas past.

Lina, the protagonist of the story, is a gifted artist and seizes every opportunity to capture, on bark or stolen paper, such moments of beauty. She also uses her artistic abilities to record the destruction and obscenities she has witnessed and experienced. Lina draws with an understanding that her depictions are recorded evidence as well as an act of defiance and freedom of expression. Moreover, she holds onto the hope that her drawings are a conduit through which her separated family can communicate and reunite. The characters in this story, and their small amount of personal belongings, are up-heaved and moved from place to place further away from their homeland and from the peaceful lives they once knew. Lina’s story, and her art, balances a wanting of what once was, with a need to move forward.

Jeanne

Readalikes:

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak (especially for those moments of beauty amidst despair)

A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini (which also emphasizes the survival of people’s traditions and culture)

The Reader by Bernhard Schlink (another story that presents complex individuals who are capable of doing good and of creating harm)

 


A Quilt for Christmas

quilt christmas jacketA Quilt for Christmas by Sandra Dallas

Eliza Spooner and her two children struggle to run their small Kansas farm after Will joins the Union Army. Eliza and her friends meet once a month to quilt and support each other, and Eliza sends Will a special down-filled quilt for Christmas. Widowed Missouri Ann and her little girl move in, and an escaped slave needs a safe place to stay. Finally, the Christmas quilt is brought home after the war in a most unexpected way. A quick read, this charming, heartwarming novel about life on the homefront during and right after the Civil War is loosely connected with The Persian Pickle Club.

Brenda


Somewhere Safe with Somebody Good

somewhere safe jacketSomewhere Safe with Somebody Good, by Jan Karon

It’s been nine years since there’s been a new book by Jan Karon set in the small town of Mitford, North Carolina, but I think it’s been worth the wait. Father Tim, an Episcopal priest, first appeared in At Home in Mitford in 1994. The two most recent books featuring Father Tim and his wife Cynthia have been set in Mississippi and Ireland. Cynthia is still writing and illustrating children’s books, and Father Tim is struggling with how to find meaning in retirement. When he is asked to preach again at the Episcopal church in Mitford, it’s a tough decision. Adopted son Dooley is in college and has given a friendship ring to Lace. Dooley’s younger brother Sammy lives next door, and Tim wonders how he can reach out to the troubled teen. An unexpected opportunity to volunteer at the local bookstore one or two days per week while the pregnant owner is on bed rest gives Tim the chance to re-connect with his friends and neighbors as Christmas approaches. All of Mitford’s quirky characters make an appearance, with plenty of laughter and some tears in this heartwarming novel.
Brenda


Ancillary Justice

ancillary justice jacketAncillary Justice by Ann Leckie

Breq is a soldier, visiting the icy world of Nilt, in search of an unscannable weapon to help in her quest of revenge against the leader of the Radch. Breq is also Justice of Toren, a spaceship that is two thousand years old, and was most recently a troop carrier in orbit around the planet of Shis’urna. In debut novelist Leckie’s universe, a starship is run by an artificial intelligence, and the same AI also has dozens of soldiers, in formerly human bodies known as ancillaries. Breq was 19 Eck. On Nilt, Breq rescues and treats the unconscious Seivarden Vendaii, a former officer on Justice of Toren who has outlived all her relatives and is addicted to kef. Breq and Seivarden, who doesn’t recognize her, have adventures while the reader learns their stories. Breq is remembering something that happened in a temple on Shis’urna, and a later incident on the starship involving a favorite officer, Lieutenant Awn. The conquering Radch are inclusive of different religions, but intolerant of civil unrest. To make things more confusing, the Radch, who have spread through many galaxies, have no gender in their language so everyone is referred to as she or her. A brilliantly imaginative book that has swept the major science fiction/fantasy awards, this book is also challenging and can be confusing. Several days after finishing this book, I’m still thinking about it, and just re-read the first chapter. This book was published a year ago, and the sequel, Ancillary Sword, has recently become available. I’m looking forward to seeing where Leckie’s creativity will take Breq in Ancillary Sword, and the final, not-yet-published book. Suggested for fans of C. J. Cherryh, John Scalzi, and Anne McCaffrey’s The Ship Who Sang.
Brenda