A History of the World in 100 Objects

A History of the World in 100 Objects, by Neil MacGregor

If you’ve ever wanted to visit the British Museum but couldn’t afford the airfare, now you don’t have too.  Neil Macgregor, Director of the British Museum brings it to you in his new book.

Here are 100 carefully selected objects that represent the sum total of the progress of Humanity.  All the major civilizations of the world are represented here, including Meso America (Olmec, Maya, Aztec) ;  South America (Paracas, Moshe, Inca);  Europe (Celts, Minoans, Athenians, Romans, Byzantium, Ottoman-Turks); the Tigris-Euphrates river valley(Sumerians, Assyrians, Lydians, Persians);  Egypt and Nile delta (Ancient Egyptians); Africa (Kushites, Oba, Kilwa, Ife);  Indus Valley (Gupta, Orissan, Mughal); and China (Zhou, Confucian, Han, Tang, and Ming Dynasties, Mongolia, Timurid Empire, Quig Dynasty).  All of the objects are either works of art or tools that look like works of art.  Some are very well known like the Rosetta Stone, Ming Vases, Beowulf’s Helmet, and The Easter Island Statues.  All the world’s great religions are profiled including Buddhism, Confucianism, Judaism, Hinduism, Zoroastrianism, and Christianity.

In each of 100 short chapters, MacGregor writes a brief description and history of each object, which keeps the book from getting long and boring.  Photographs of the objects are beautifully rendered against mostly black backgrounds. Also included is a brief paragraph from experts in their various fields such as Archaeology, Linguistics, Ancient Literature, etc.

Here is an example of one of the interesting things one could learn from this book. This passage refers to Marco Polo and his first encounter with now world famous Chinese Ceramics:  

 “One of the Startling things he had seen was Porcelain; indeed, the very word ‘porcelain’ comes to us from Marco Polo’s description of his travels in Qubilai Khan China. The Italian porcellana, little piglet, is a slang word for cowry shells, which do indeed look a little like curled-up piglets.  And the only thing that Marco Polo could think of to give his readers an idea of the shell-like sheen of the hard, fine ceramics that he saw in China was a cowry shell, a porcellana. And so we’ve called it ‘little piglets’ porcelain, ever since –this is if we’re not just calling it ‘china’.

A book that is very worth your while.

Joel



Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s