The Alloy of Law

The Alloy of Law, by Brandon Sanderson

This is not the usual lengthy fantasy novel readers have come to expect from Brandon Sanderson. It’s much shorter, faster-paced, and has more humor. The Alloy of Law is as much a western as a fantasy novel. While part of his Mistborn series, it’s set 300 years later, with all new characters. Waxillium and Wayne fight crime in the Roughs, aided by their magical allomantic and feruchemical powers. Wayne can create a slow time bubble and heals well, while Wax can push on steel and make himself lighter or heavier, moving like a superhero. After a tragedy, Wax must move to the family mansion in the city of Elendel, become Lord Waxillium Ladrian, and take over the family business. He also needs to start a family, and meets with Lady Steris and her father, Lord Harms, to discuss a proposal for courtship and possible marriage. Their first date, where they are joined by Steris’ cousin Marasi, a student of criminal justice, is at a wedding banquet. Their waiter turns out to be Wayne, a master of disguise. When thieves break into the banquet hall, open fire, and kidnap a lady, Wax and Wayne are back in the crime-fighting business, aided by Marasi. Recent mysterious railcar thefts and kidnapping of ladies with allomantic or feruchemical powers are probably connected, and they suspect their former colleague Miles, who is practically impossible to kill, of turning villain.

A fun read, and a nice change of pace. I read the book, but the audio version is also getting great reviews.

Brenda


The Sisters Brothers

The Sisters Brothers, by Patrick deWitt

I don’t read a lot of westerns, but the funny title and striking cover caught my eye. Eli and Charlie Sisters are outlaws based in Oregon City in 1851, during the Gold Rush. Their boss, the mysterious Commodore, has a new job for the Sisters brothers; to kill gold prospector Herman Kermit Warm near San Francisco. The trip doesn’t begin well; Eli resents that Charlie has been put in charge, and Eli’s current horse, Tub, may not be up for such a long journey. 

Charlie got into a lot of fights as a kid, and the larger Eli defended him. Now Charlie likes to drink, and kill people. Eli, however, is starting to listen to his conscience, although he feels obligated to help his brother. But really, Eli’s not very happy, and he might like to be a shopkeeper instead, and settle down with a nice woman. Eccentric characters and numerous adventures enliven their journey, along with comic interludes. The horse Tub continues his decline, but Eli doesn’t want to part with him. Herman Kermit Warm is not the thief the Sisters brothers expected, and his secret to successful gold prospecting comes with a high price. I’m not a bit surprised that film rights have already been optioned for this darkly funny, award-winning, offbeat Western. For an animated video about the book, visit the author’s web site.

Brenda


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