A Murder of Magpies

murder of magpies jacketA Murder of Magpies by Judith Flanders

Sam Clair, 40, is a book editor for Timmins and Ross in London. She lives alone, and likes it. Sam dislikes the frequent meetings with the other editors, and edits mostly women’s fiction. When her star author delivers a very different book than expected and a police inspector interviews her about a missed delivery, life gets more interesting. A break-in at her flat leads to an acquaintance with her reclusive upstairs neighbor, and increased attention from the attractive inspector, Jake Fields. Even Sam’s mother, Helena, a solicitor, gets involved when Sam’s author and friend Kit Lovell goes missing. Kit has just sent Sam his new manuscript, a tell-all about a fashion icon’s death that may be libelous. A fascinating look at the world of London book publishing, where Sam has both too much work and too many parties to attend, and hopes that her newest assistant, Miranda, might stay for longer than a couple of months. A cozy mystery with humor and a touch of romance, I enjoyed the fast pace and the lack of predictability. This is the first novel from a former book editor who writes articles about the arts and books about Victorian life.
Brenda


Amy Falls Down

amy jacketAmy Falls Down by Jincy Willett

Amy Gallup is a published writer, but has had writer’s block for twenty years. Living with her basset hound Alphonse in a small house in southern California, she teaches writing. Some unsettling events with her last group of aspiring writers led Amy to teaching exclusively online. After an accident knocks her unconscious, she gives an interview to a local reporter, but can’t remember what she said. The newspaper account of the interview is hilarious, and helps jump start her career. Carla and other members of the writing class want her back, longtime agent Maxine keeps calling, and Amy starts writing stories. Getting her fifteen minutes of fame, Amy is booked for interviews and talks around the country, and comes out of her hermit’s shell. I loved that she insisted on taking her dog with her on tour, and that she doesn’t buy into the hype of marketing and branding one’s writing. The people in her new writing group are memorable, as are some people she meets on her travels, as well as the handful of people in Amy’s past that she recalls for the reader, especially her former husband Max. A book about writers and writing doesn’t sound compelling, but I found it alternately touching and very funny.
Brenda

 


Maeve’s Times

maeve's times jacketMaeve’s Times: In Her Own Words by Maeve Binchy

Maeve Binchy fans rejoice! A new collection of her articles from the Irish Times has just been published. A wide variety of topics are included, most humorous but some serious, and the articles were written over a period of five decades. Maeve, who died in 2012, was a born storyteller who wrote for the paper’s London office, bringing an Irish viewpoint to stories set in England and abroad. Maeve writes about royal weddings, Margaret Thatcher, clothing, travel in Europe and Australia, life as a young teacher, boring airline passengers, daily life, and getting older. In case you missed it, her last collection of connected stories, Chestnut Street, was published earlier this year.

Brenda


Since You’ve Been Gone

since you've been gone jacketSince You’ve Been Gone by Anouska Knight

Holly Jefferson’s life basically consists of working at her bakery with her assistant Jesse, walking the dog, sleeping, and visiting her sister’s family once a week. That’s all she can manage since the death of her husband Charlie almost two years ago. Their partly renovated cottage is unchanged, and Holly is completely uninterested in a social life. A series of unusual cake commissions and deliveries lead to memorable encounters with handsome Ciaran Argyll and his hilariously rude father, wealthy developer Fergal, completely shaking up Holly’s boring routine. I quite enjoyed this charming British romantic comedy.

Brenda


The Rosie Project

rosie project jacketThe Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion

I really enjoyed reading this heartwarming romantic comedy. Australian genetics professor Don Tillman, who may remind readers of television’s Sheldon Cooper, has been on many first dates but no second dates. Striving for more efficiency on the Wife Project, he compiles a questionnaire to weed out women who smoke, drink too much, are often late, and are vegetarians. His friends, fellow professor Gene and his psychologist wife Claudia, encourage him to be more open-minded. Don likes routine and efficiency, and clashes with his Dean when a student plagiarizes an essay. Then along comes Rosie. She smokes, is late, works in a bar part-time, and only eats sustainable seafood. She is not at all suitable, but is intelligent, beautiful, and very good company. Rosie asks Don to help her find her biological father, and they initiate the Father Project, which even takes them on a trip to New York City, where Don discovers baseball. Don is frequently clueless but often charming, and struggles with the idea of love, while unpredictable Rosie is more than she appears at first. This first novel is a thoroughly engaging read.

Brenda

 


Love, Nina

nina jacket

Love, Nina: A Nanny Writes Home by Nina Stibbe

Mid 1980s London comes to life with Nina Stibbe’s letters home to her sister. Funny, poignant, refreshing, and thoughtful, I really enjoyed reading this memoir. At 20, Nina becomes the live-in nanny for Sam and Will Frears, who live with their mother, editor Mary-Kay Wilmers. Sam has some significant health issues, and they are mentioned but not a focus of the book. Literary celebrities like Alan Bennett frequently stop by, and this makes for some unusual dinner table conversations. Great books are discussed, as well as how to swear in German. Nina’s sister sends her recipes, and some are more popular with the family than others. Nina and the boys have adventures in London, comment on Mary-Kay’s dates, and casually refer to Nina’s trouble parking the family car. Nina is encouraged to consider college, and struggles with the recommended reading list in English literature. Even after she starts school, she maintains her close connection with the family.

Brenda

 


I Dare Me

i dare me jacketI Dare Me by Lu Ann Cahn

At the end of 2009, Lu Ann Cahn is feeling stuck. She’s happily married, on good terms with her grown daughter, a long-time cancer survivor, and respected for her work as a news reporter in Philadelphia. But still, not happy. And also not happily embracing new technology or social media. So she begins 2010 with a project to embrace and blog about a Year of Firsts. For 365 days in a row, she tries something new, or something (like hula hooping) that she hasn’t done in over a decade. Her firsts include: a polar bear plunge, taking a ballet class, baking a chocolate cake, zip lining, using an ebook reader, paying other people’s parking meters, sewing on a button, and going to the opera. Some were fun, others took more daring, some days weren’t very successful, but every day Lu Ann tried something new. She learned to embrace change, say “yes” more, got recharged and changed her life in surprising ways. Read more about her firsts on her website, and link to short video clips of her experiences. Looking to make 2014 different from last year? Lu Ann’s book may inspire you to embrace change, too.

Brenda


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