The End of All Things

end jacketThe End of All Things by John Scalzi

If the enemy of an enemy is a friend, then two space empires, one human and one alien, should work together despite their differences to prevent a war and save Earth. Readers of Scalzi’s science fiction space operas may be familiar with the alien Conclave and the human Colonial Union. Familiar characters are joined by pilot Rafe Daquin, who has to think his way out of a terrible situation, and Lieutenant Heather Lee, whose paratrooper forces are tired of visiting planet after planet to keep the peace. Exciting and thought-provoking, this book is darker in tone although less violent than other books in the Old Man’s War series; a satisfying read. Old Man’s War is the first book in the series, one more book is planned.

The Watchmaker of Filigree Street

watchmaker jacketThe Watchmaker of Filigree Street by Natasha Pulley

A highly imaginative, page-turning first novel, set mostly in Victorian London and partly in imperial Japan. Former pianist Thaniel Steepleton helps support his widowed sister by working as a telegraph operator for the Home Office. A bomb threat is received, and Thaniel finds that his flat was broken into. Nothing was taken, but a pocket watch was left. After an alarm on the watch saves his life during an explosion, Thaniel seeks out the watchmaker, the mysterious Keita Mori. Mori is a Japanese nobleman who is a genius with clockwork, and who can sometimes “remember” the future. He even has a clockwork pet, an octopus. Scotland Yard suspects Mori of making a bomb, and Grace Carrow thinks he is probably guilty. Grace is a physics student who needs to marry in order to inherit her aunt’s house, where she can set up a lab. Victorian London is vividly described, including a diplomatic party, a Gilbert and Sullivan performance, and a Japanese exhibition village in Knightsbridge. With plenty of suspense and intrigue along with an unpredictable plot, this is an impressive, original debut.


Eight Hundred Grapes

grapes jacketEight Hundred Grapes by Laura Dave

Georgia Ford comes home to her family’s Sonoma Valley vineyard the week before her wedding, needing time to think but finding secrets and chaos. Two marriages are in trouble, and her parents are selling the vineyard. Georgia, a real estate lawyer, has just found out that her British fiance Ben has a daughter. It’s not clear when Ben meant to share that news with Georgia, even though they are moving to London right after their wedding. The Fords’ last harvest festival is just around the corner, and Georgia and her brothers struggle to reconnect while the reader learns through flashbacks the history of the family vineyard. I think the number of problems and secrets affecting the Ford family is much too high, but the characters feel real and the vineyard setting is well drawn. More of a family drama than a romantic comedy, this novel may become a movie. I think readers of books by Robyn Carr about the Lacoumette family, The Promise and New Hope, would enjoy this book.


Enchanted August

enchanted august jacketEnchanted August by Brenda Bowen

Imagine spending the whole month of August in a rambling cottage on an island off the coast of Maine. No cars allowed, cell phones rarely work, there are amazing views and trails, and cold water for swimming. There are blueberries to pick and sea glass to collect. Add in a hat party, a lobster bake, a tiny library, friendly islanders, a children’s musical that needs a director and you get a charming beach book, inspired by The Enchanted April, by Elizabeth von Arnim. Two preschool moms, Lottie and Rose, leave their families behind in Brooklyn for a real escape, and are joined by actress Carolyn and Beverly, an older gay man in mourning who enjoys cooking. Lottie and Rose eventually welcome their families for a visit, and cottage owner Robert even comes to stay. The cottage and the island setting are lovingly detailed, and are a large part of this novel’s appeal. This is a pleasant summer read.


September Book Discussions

wind is not a river jacket The Tuesday Morning Book Group is discussing The Wind is Not a River by Brian Payton at 10:00 a.m. on September 15. Set in Seattle and Alaska in 1942, this novel is part adventure, and part wartime love story. Helen Easley is anxious for news of her husband, John, a war correspondent. He wasn’t on an official assignment, but ends up in the Aleutian Islands at just the wrong time.

The Tuesday Evening Book Group is discussing The Boston Girl by Anita Diamant at 7:00 p.m. on September 22. Addie Baum is the Boston girl, born in 1900 to poor Russian Jewish immigrants. Addie looks back on her eventful life as her granddaughter interviews her.

The Crime Readers are meeting on Thursday, September 17 at 7:00 p.m. to discuss Death at La Fenice by Donna Leon, the first Guido Brunetti mystery, set in contemporary Venice. The Crime Readers, co-sponsored by the Indian Prairie Public Library, meet at Home Run Inn Pizza in Darien. Optional dinner is at 6:00 girl jacket

Copies of all three titles are available now at the Adult/Young Adult Reference Desk.


The Boston Girl

boston girl jacketThe Boston Girl by Anita Diamant

Addie Baum, born in 1900, is looking back at her life as her granddaughter interviews her. The daughter of Russian Jewish immigrants, Addie is happiest at school. Her mother talks about how life would be better if the family had never left Russia, while Addie’s older sisters Betty and Celia strongly disagree, even though they live in a one-room apartment. Celia is timid and delicate, but steps in so that Addie can attend high school for a year and participate in the Saturday Club at a Boston settlement house. A trip to the seaside Rockport Lodge introduces her to girls who will stay her friends for many years. Celia marries a widower, modern Betty works at a department store, and Addie’s father spends most of his time at the synagogue. Addie becomes a secretary at her brother-in-law’s shirt factory, while attending the occasional night class and keeping up with her Saturday Club. The influenza epidemic causes more suffering and Addie struggles to find happiness, moving to a boarding house, trying to become a newspaper reporter and not having luck with men. Life becomes much better after sister Betty marries, and then Addie finally meets a nice man. Addie’s resilience, rebellious streak, and sense of humor make her an appealing narrator in this novel about working-class Boston girls and immigrant life.

Last Bus to Wisdom

last bus jacketLast Bus to Wisdom by Ivan Doig

Imagine being an eleven-year-old boy in 1951, setting off halfway across the country on a Greyhound bus, alone. Donal Cameron has an amazing summer of adventure, both good and very bad. It was bittersweet to read Ivan Doig’s last novel; I’m glad it was so enjoyable. Life on the bus, a quarrelsome great aunt who insists on teaching him canasta, close calls with the police, excitement at a rodeo, meeting hobos, and life on a ranch at haying time enliven a memorable story. Other memorable books by Doig include The Whistling Season and The Bartender’s Tale.



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